Hier können Sie die Auswahl einschränken.
Wählen Sie einfach die verschiedenen Kriterien aus.
Exteriors and Interiors
Robert Polidori
Hotel Petra #1, Beirut
2010
Aqueaous Inkjet on natural fiber paper mounted on Dibond / Inkjet auf Naturpapier auf Dibond kaschiert
189,8 x 151,9 cm

Robert Polidori »

Exteriors and Interiors

Exhibition: 5 Sep 2014 – 10 Jan 2015

Fri 5 Sep 18:00 - 22:00

Galerie Karsten Greve

Drususgasse 1-5
50667 Köln

+49 (0)221-2571012


www.galerie-karsten-greve.com

Tue-Fri 10-18.30, Sat 10-18

Exteriors and Interiors
Robert Polidori
Hotel Petra #3, Beirut
2010
Aqueaous Inkjet on natural fiber paper mounted on Dibond / Inkjet auf Naturpapier auf Dibond kaschiert
189,8 x 151,9 cm

Robert Polidori
"Exteriors and Interiors"


Exhibition: 5 September – 8 December 2014

Opening: 5 September, 6-10pm

Galerie Karsten Greve is pleased to present a comprehensive solo exhibition of new photography by Robert Polidori, which places multiple groups of his works in dialogue with one another. In Exteriors and Interiors, images from his series Beyrouth and Dendritic Cities will be shown for the first time, works that the photographer, b. 1951 in Montréal, Canada, produced between 2008 and 2011. Polidori’s views of exterior and interior spaces in their urban contexts are like portraits that make the passage of time visible in present-day images.

Beyrouth is composed of interior views of buildings that have been shaped by acts of violence and by natural processes of decay. While in Beirut, Polidori sought out the once-dignified Hotel Petra, which had remained sealed off for nearly 23 years following the destruction of the Lebanese civil war. Sheltered from all human intervention, the building succumbed to ‘natural’ forms of decay. The walls are covered with numerous coats of paint that, over time, have flaked away and faded to the point that the underlying colours reveal themselves in changing tones and intensities. These processes of deterioration caused by age produce a broad spectrum of nuances: “The blue, yellow and orange tones and the unbelievable range of colours fascinatedme at once. The scene is a sort of study of the flaking and layering of colours.” (Polidori)

Yet Polidori emphasises not only the painterly quality of these walls, but also the historical aspect that inhabits this “natural painting”. He describes the abstract forms that arise due solely due to the passage of time as “the archaeology of painting”: “Walls are the support on which time becomes visible.” (Polidori) With the snap of the camera shutter, time and its effects are encompassed: the state captured by Polidori becomes an historical manifestation. The chromatic gradations reveal – in a way similar to an elipses – the chronology of past events. The characteristic surface texture of the building, whose damaged beauty serves as an emblem to nearby residents of the painful experience of the war, can be conceived of not only as a portrait, but also a memorial: a symbol of the collective memory. Although he recognises the poetic quality of the wornaway, faded tones, Polidori is no proponent of the romanticisation and aestheticisation of ruins. Instead, he follows his need to capture and realistically document the “memory of the walls” with his camera, going beyond the awareness of the visible to steer our attention to the concealed background “to get a complete picture of what really happened.” (Polidori) Since surface details always constitute clues for Polidori – indicators of deeper structures – the situations he depicts are witnesses to decisive social, historical and political changes that have left their mark in a singular, concrete form. In the exhibition, the juxtaposition of this ‘natural’ painting with the photographs of historic paintings at the Chateau de Versailles (from his series “Parcours Muséologique Revisité”) emphasises the fact that Polidori, through his painstaking observation of the circumstances he stumbles across, highlights the tangible remains of the past.

“I‘m interested in the traces left by the passage of time in a room, a building or a city.“ (Polidori) The artist also pursues these traces in the panoramas of his series entitled “Dendritic Cities”. Here he confronts the phenomenon of the rampant growth of so-called cités sauvages, whose uncontrolled spread around the edges of major cities follows no principle of urban planning, but is rather a direct result of socioeconomic conditions. Whether it is a slum in India or a Favela in Brazil, Polidori is always fascinated by such cities, which “spring up suddenly and disappear again after 50 years. They are temporary structures that grow up out of necessity.” One of these scenarios of change in which a temporal development makes itself noticeable is the Indian slum of Dharavi. Originally located on the outskirts of India’s megalopolis Mumbai, it quickly became engulfed so that today – unusually for a slum – it lies right in the middle of the city. In order to cope with the acute lack of space, old structures are torn down and new, improvised living spaces are built for the constant influx of people. Similar to the layers of paint on the wand of the Hotel Petra, the shacks are piled one on top of the other, surrounded by a confusingmass of one- and two-storey buildings. The quickly changing appearance of the city is also portrayed in the views of Amman, Jordan. Nearly all of the buildings pictured were built after 1991 when, as a consequence of the conflict in Iraq and the expulsion of Palestinians from Kuwait, the city received a wave of refugees, making the construction of emergency housing a necessity.

In contrast to his interiors, which are shot with a long exposure, these images are composed of many individual short-exposure photographs of a preexistent situation, which he pieces together into a multilayer composition whose irregular contour can be viewed as a formal equivalent of the unregulated, unrestrained urban sprawl. The new compositions contains individual details that originate from multiple perspectives instead of just one. Polidori does not select just one decisive moment, but gives equal value to multiple “decisive moments” (Polidori), so that they coexist simultaneously within the picture.With this approach he comments at once on the recording of history, which is replaced or altered by processes of layering and suppression of certain perceptions of that which happened, the plurality overridden by one single perspective. When applied to personal experience, the act of remembering also transforms our experience by a permanent regrouping and reordering of memories.

Robert Polidori moved to New York in the 1970s, where he initially worked for Jonas Mekas at the Anthology Film Archive. In 1980 he received his Master’s Degree from the State University of New York. He has twice been honoured with the Alfred Eisenstaedt Award for Magazine Photography (1999 and 2000). In 1998 he received the World Press Award for his documentation of the construction of the Getty Museum, and in 2007 and 2008 he received the Communication Arts Award. Polidori’s work is represented in prestigious public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris. Robert Polidori lives and works in Los Angeles. He has received special recognition not only for his many years of work for The New Yorker, but also for extraordinary projects such as his long-term documentation of the renovation of the Château de Versailles, which he began in the mid-1980s and which has received numerous awards. Many art books of his work have been printed, most recently Eye and I, which contains impressive portraits.

Exteriors and Interiors
Robert Polidori
Hotel Petra #5, Beirut
2010
Aqueaous Inkjet on natural fiber paper mounted on Dibond / Inkjet auf Naturpapier auf Dibond kaschiert
151,9 x 189,8 cm

Robert Polidori
"Exteriors and Interiors"

Ausstellung: 5. September – 8. Dezember 2014
Eröffnung: 5. September, 18 bis 22 Uhr

Öffnungszeiten am DC Open Wochenende:
5. September 18-22 Uhr, 6. September 12-20 Uhr und 7. September 12-18 Uhr

Öffnungszeiten während der Internationalen Photoszene Köln:
19. September 10-22 Uhr, 20. September 11-19 Uhr und 21. September 11-19 Uhr

Die Galerie Karsten Greve freut sich, neue Fotografien von Robert Polidori in einer umfassenden Einzelpräsentation zu zeigen, die mehrere Werkgruppen in Bezug zueinander setzt. Erstmals werden in der Ausstellung Exteriors and Interiors Motive aus den Serien „Beyrouth“ und „Dendritic Cities“ gezeigt, die der 1951 in Montréal, Kanada geborene Fotograf zwischen 2008 und 2011 aufgenommen hat. Polidoris Ansichten von Außenräumen und Innenräumen aus dem städtischen Zusammenhang wirken wie Portraits, die zeitlich bedingte Veränderungen im gegenwärtigen Erscheinungsbild sichtbar machen.

„Beyrouth“ besteht aus Innenansichten von Gebäuden, die durch gewaltsame Einwirkungen und Verwitterung gezeichnet erscheinen. Polidori hat in Beirut das neben dem ehrwürdigen Grand Théatre de Beyrouth gelegene Hotel Petra aufgesucht, das nach den Zerstörungen des libanesischen Bürgerkriegs nahezu 25 Jahre lang abgeriegelt blieb. Von menschlichen Eingriffen verschont, ist es dem „natürlichen“ Verfall überlassen gewesen. Die Wände sind mit zahlreichen Farbschichten bedeckt, die im Laufe der Zeit abgeblättert und verblasst sind, so dass zugrundeliegende Farbtöne in changierenden Intensitäten zum Vorschein kommen. Diese altersbedingten Auflösungsprozesse ergeben ein breites Spektrum an Nuancen: „Die Blau-, Gelb- und Orangetöne und der wahnsinnige Farbumfang haben mir sofort gefallen. Die Szene ist wie eine Studie über das Sichauflösen und Überlagern von Farbe.“ Polidori betont jedoch nicht nur die malerische Qualität dieser Wände, sondern vielmehr den geschichtlichen Aspekt, der dieser „natürlichen Malerei“ innewohnt. Er bezeichnet diese rein durch zeitliche Einwirkungen entstandenen Abstraktionen als „Archäologie der Malerei“: „Wände sind das Trägermaterial, auf dem Zeit sichtbar wird.“ (Polidori)

So sind in diesen Momentaufnahmen die Zeit (und ihre Auswirkungen) verdichtet, der von Polidori eingefangene Zustand wird zur historischen Manifestation. In der Chromatik farblicher Abstufungen offenbart sich – einem Palimpsest vergleichbar – die Chronologie geschichtlicher Ereignisse. Die charakteristischen Oberflächenstrukturen des Gebäudes, dessen verwundete Schönheit der einheimischen Bevölkerung als Sinnbild der schmerzhaften Erfahrung des Krieges dient, lassen sich nicht nur als individuelles Portrait, sondern auch als Mahnmal, als Wahrzeichen kollektiver Erinnerung begreifen. Obwohl er die Poesie abgetragener, verwaschener Farbqualitäten anerkennt, ist Polidori kein Anhänger einer ästhetisierenden Ruinenromantik. Stattdessen folgt er seinem realitätsnahen, „dokumentarischen“ Bedürfnis, das „Gedächtnis der Gemäuer“ mit seiner Kamera zu erfassen und damit ausgehend vom Sichtbaren das erweiterteAugenmerk auf die verborgenen Hintergründe zu lenken: „um ein vollständiges Bild des Geschehens zu erhalten“ („to get a complete picture of what really happened“). Da für Polidori oberflächliche Merkmale immer Indizien, Indikatoren tiefgreifender Strukturen darstellen, sind die von ihm abgebildeten Situationen Zeugnisse einschneidender sozialer, historischer und politischer Veränderungen, die sich in einer singulären äußeren Form niedergeschlagen haben.

In der Ausstellung wird durch die Gegenüberstellung der malerischen Wandflächen des Hotels Petra mit den Nahaufnahmen alternder Gemälde aus Schloss Versailles (aus der Reihe „Parcours Muséologique Revisité“) deutlich, dass Polidori in seiner sorgfältigen Beobachtung vorgefundener Zustände die Insignien der Vergänglichkeit hervorhebt.

„Mich interessieren die Spuren der Zeit in einem Raum, einem Gebäude oder einer Stadt.“ (Polidori) Diesen Spuren der Zeit geht Polidori auch in seinen Panoramen der Serie „Dendritic Cities“ nach. Hier befasst er sich mit dem Phänomen des wuchernden Wachstums sogenannter cités sauvages, deren unkontrollierte Ausbreitung vor allem in den Außenbezirken moderner Großstädte keiner urbanistischen Planung folgt, sondern aus unmittelbaren gesellschaftlichen Gegebenheiten resultiert. Ob es sich um einen Slum in Indien oder eine Favela in Brasilien handelt: stets interessieren Polidori solche Städte, die „plötzlich auftauchen und nach 50 Jahren wieder verschwinden. Es sind temporäre Strukturen, die aus einer Notwendigkeit heraus erwachsen sind.“

Eines dieser Szenarien des Wandels, in denen eine zeitliche Entwicklung ablesbar wird, ist der indische Slum Dharavi. Ursprünglich am Stadtrand von Indiens Megalopolis Mumbai gelegen, wurde er bald von der Stadt umwachsen, so dass er heute – unüblich für einen Slum – mitten in der Stadt liegt. Um den akuten Platzmangel zu umgehen, werden durch Abriss und improvisierten Aufbau neue Wohnmöglichkeiten geschaffen für den ständigen Zustrom an Menschen. Ähnlich wie die Farbschichten auf den Wänden des Hotels Petra sind hier die Hütten übereinandergestapelt, aufgetürmt und ergeben ein unübersichtliches Gewirr aus ein- und zweistöckigen Gebäuden. Der schnelle Wandel des Stadtbildes zeichnet sich auch in den Ansichten von Ammann, Jordanien ab. Hier sind beinahe alle Gebäude nach 1991 entstanden, als die Stadt in der Folge des Irak-Konflikts und der Vertreibung der Palästinenser aus Kuwait verstärkt Flüchtlinge aufgenommen hat, wodurch die Errichtung von Unterkünften notdürftig vorgenommen wurde.

Im Unterschied zu seinen Innenansichten, die mit einer langen Belichtungszeit aufgenommen werden, entstehen diese Arbeiten aus vielen einzelnen, kurz belichteten Aufnahmen einer vorgefundenen Situation, die er zu einem vielschichtigen, äußerst dichten Motiv zusammensetzt, dessen unregelmäßig verlaufende Kontur als formale Entsprechung der ungeregelten, zügellosen Ausbreitung gesehen werden kann. Die neue Komposition enthält somit Einzelheiten, die nicht einer einzigen, sondern multiplen Perspektiven entstammen. Polidori gesteht nicht dem einen entscheidenden Moment sondern mehreren „entscheidenden Momenten“ (Polidori) den gleichen Wert zu, so dass sie simultan im Bild koexistieren. Mit dieser Vorgehensweise kommentiert er zugleich die Geschichtsschreibung, die durch Prozesse der Überlagerung und Verdrängung bestimmte Auffassungen des Gewesenen durch andere ersetzt bzw. durchsetzt und die Pluralität zugunsten einer singulären Sichtweise aufhebt. Auch übertragen auf das persönliche Erleben, wird der Vorgang der Erinnerung zur permanenten Umschichtung und Neuordnung von Erfahrungswerten.

Robert Polidori übersiedelte in den siebziger Jahren von seinem Geburtsland Kanada nach New York, wo er zunächst für Jonas Mekas am Anthology Film Archiv arbeitete. 1980 erhielt er seinen Master an der State University of New York. 1998 erhielt er den World Press Award für seine Dokumentation zum Bau des Getty Museums. Bereits zweimal wurde er mit dem Alfred Eisenstaedt Award für Magazinfotografie ausgezeichnet (1999 und 2000). 2007 und 2008 wurde ihm der Communication Arts Award verliehen. Die Arbeiten Polidoris befinden sich unter anderem in der Sammlung des Metropolitan Museum of Art und im Museum of Modern Art, New York, sowie im Victoria and Albert Museum in London und in der Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris. Besondere Anerkennung erlangte Robert Polidori nicht nur durch seine langjährige Tätigkeit für das Magazin The New Yorker, sondern auch durch beeindruckende Projekte wie seine Langzeitdokumentation der Renovierung des Château de Versailles ab Mitte der 1980er Jahre, die mehrfach prämiert wurde. Zu seinem fotografischen Werk sind zahlreiche Kunstbände erschienen, zuletzt „Eye and I“ mit beeindruckenden Menschenbildern. Robert Polidori lebt und arbeitet in Los Angeles.

Exteriors and Interiors
Robert Polidori
Favela Rocinha #1, Rio de Janeiro
2009
UV-Cured ink on Aluminium/ Acrylic Inkjet auf Aluminium
285,1 x 449,6 cm