Hier können Sie die Auswahl einschränken.
Wählen Sie einfach die verschiedenen Kriterien aus.
Masterworks – Photographs from "People of the 20th Century"
August Sander
Bauernkinder / Farm Children, 1913
© Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur – August Sander Archiv; VG Bild-Kunst, 2018

August Sander »

Masterworks – Photographs from "People of the 20th Century"

Meisterwerke – Photographien aus "Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts"

Exhibition: 7 Sep 2018 – 27 Jan 2019

Thu 6 Sep 19:00

Die Photographische Sammlung / SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln

Im Mediapark 7
50670 Köln

+49 (0)221-88895300


www.photographie-sk-kultur.de

Thu-Tue 14-19

Masterworks – Photographs from "People of the 20th Century"
August Sander
Hausierer / Peddler, 1930
© Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur – August Sander Archiv; VG Bild-Kunst, 2018

August Sander
Masterworks – Photographs from "People of the 20th Century" (Room 1)

Exhibition: 7 September, 2018 – 27 January, 2019
Opening: 6 September, 7pm

The current exhibition, featuring over 150 original photographs and numerous documents shown in display cases, presents a representative cross-section of the "People of the 20th Century" project.

The portraits from August Sander’s epochal work are not only of fundamental importance for the history of photography; they are also highly exciting objects of study – masterpieces for anyone who has an unsentimental, unbiased love of people and life; who likes to ask questions about the past and gather experiences for the future; who has a passion for looking, discovering, fantasizing, and analyzing: How do the people portrayed appear to us today? How did they spend their lives? What delighted or shocked them? What experiences left a mark on their faces, their hands, their physiognomy? What can they share with us from their own bygone world and times? How did Sander manage to meet and talk to so many different people, and to entice them into posing for a picture? What does the photographic material convey to us today – at a time when hardly any photographs are developed in the darkroom anymore and a kind of magic has thus been lost? What does time and manual craft mean for artistic engagement?

Viewed together, the people August Sander (1876–1964) depicted in such an objective yet dignified and personal manner unfold a whole cosmos that brings history to life. Looking at Sander’s photographs challenges us to search for similarities, differences, and comparable qualities. They summon memories of accounts from the past, render tangible transformations in people’s living conditions and way of life; we see occupations that have changed, which no longer exist or have been replaced; developments or events in society are made more vivid to us, as are changing pictorial styles and artistic aesthetics.

And yet apart from the referential character of Sander’s photographs, their historical relevance and inspirational force, qualities that have been highlighted by renowned authors such as Walter Benjamin, Alfred Döblin, Golo Mann, and Kurt Tucholsky, the pictures depict very concrete moments and display individually a remarkable degree of aesthetic quality. They compellingly demonstrate Sander’s knack at capturing reality and his eye for composing specific details into lifelike documentary photographs. Being able to experience this quality up close based on August Sander’s original handmade prints is a real privilege and something that can only be made possible on this scale in rare cases due to the conservation requirements of these so-called vintage prints.

August Sander first presented his project "People of the 20th Century" in 1927 at the Kölnischer Kunstverein. He had selected more than 110 prints, a group that, as far as can be reconstructed, largely diverges from the current presentation, let alone the fact that several different prints of individual motifs were and are in circulation. Since Sander developed the project or – as he called it – his cultural work "People of the 20th Century" between circa 1925 and 1955, i.e., over the course of three decades, also incorporating motifs he had produced from 1892 onwards, his stock of original prints and portfolios had grown immensely by the end of his life. Within his archive, this group of works forms a kind of cache from which the photographer drew freely for exhibitions and publications. This was a uniquely innovative approach in his day. Sander’s awareness of the exponential effect of image series as opposed to individual images made him a pioneer of conceptual photography, as did his resolute use of an unmanipulated, factual reproduction of his chosen motifs. His portraits were meant to underline his documentary approach and to do without any artistic embellishments while nonetheless manifesting a fine-tuned and restrained design.

Sander endeavored with his extensive portrait work to show a cross-section of the population, including people practicing different occupations and from various walks of life and generations – a mirror of his times. This intention is echoed in the title of his first book, "Antlitz der Zeit" (Face of Our Time), published in 1929. The indirectly expressed face of the time as well as individual physiognomies were the focus of the photographer’s undivided attention for decades.

To give form to his growing compendium, Sander created a concept in the mid-1920s for naming most of the image groups and portfolios that were at the center of his work. The groups are called: "The Farmer," "The Skilled Tradesman," "The Woman," "Classes and Professions," "The Artists," "The City," and "The Last People." The latter, perhaps misleading, term stands for a series of pictures that respectfully show people on the fringes of society. Sander’s concept at the time, which proposed a sequential arrangement of groups and portfolios, is also followed in the current exhibition, drawing on single images or groups of representative prints from the corresponding portfolios.

Most of the photographs come from the August Sander Archive, which Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur acquired in 1992, thus laying the cornerstone for the Cologne photography collection’s further development. These works from the archive are joined in the show by exclusive loans of originals from the Berlinische Galerie, Museum für Moderne Kunst, Berlin; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich, as well as from major private collections.

Accompanying the exhibition is the catalogue August Sander – "Meisterwerke/Masterpieces", published in German and English by the Schirmer/Mosel Verlag. This is the first publication on the photographer to feature original prints reproduced in their authentic tonality and with original cropping. Digital data obtained by scanning the originals were coordinated according to many different factors and then printed in four colors. Gabriele Conrath-Scholl has written a catalogue essay that explores in depth how "People of the 20th Century" developed over time, adding a new chapter to the discourse on August Sander’s oeuvre, which has played a central role in the program of the Munich publishing house ever since it published Sander’s "Rheinlandschaften" in 1975, followed by numerous additional titles.

Masterworks – Photographs from "People of the 20th Century"
August Sander
Die Familie in der Generation / Three Generations oft he Family, 1912
© Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur – August Sander Archiv; VG Bild-Kunst, 2018
Dauerleihgabe / Permanent Loan, Stadt Herdorf

August Sander
Meisterwerke – Photographien aus "Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts"


Ausstellung: 7. September 2018 bis 27. Januar 2019 (Raum 1)
Eröffnung und Preisverleihung an Francesco Neri: Donnerstag, 6. September, 19 Uhr

Die aktuelle Ausstellung mit über 150 Originalphotographien und zahlreichem Vitrinen-Material zeigt einen repräsentativen Querschnitt durch das Projekt "Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts".

Die Bilder aus August Sanders Porträtwerk sind nicht nur für die Geschichte der Photographie fundamental, sie sind für all jene höchst spannende Studienobjekte und Meisterwerke, die ohne Sentimentalität und Vorurteil den Menschen und das Leben lieben, Fragen ans Gestern stellen und Erfahrungen für die Zukunft sammeln; für all jene, die eine Leidenschaft fürs Hinschauen, Entdecken, Phantasieren und Analysieren haben: Wie erscheinen uns die Dargestellten, wie haben sie ihr Leben verbracht, was hat sie erfreut und erschüttert, was hat ihre Gesichter, ihre Hände, ihre Physiognomie gezeichnet? Was teilen sie aus ihrer Welt mit? Wie hat Sander es geschafft, all die unterschiedlichen Menschen zu treffen, anzusprechen, zu positionieren, fürs Bild zu begeistern? Was vermittelt uns das photographische Material heute – in einer Zeit, in der das Entwickeln einer Photographie in der Dunkelkammer kaum mehr praktiziert wird und ein Zauber verloren geht? Was bedeutet Zeit und Handarbeit für die künstlerische Auseinandersetzung?

Zusammenbetrachtet bieten die von August Sander (1876–1964) so sachlich wie würdevoll und individuell abgebildeten Personen einen Kosmos, der Geschichte lebendig werden lässt. Angesichts Sanders Photographien scheint unser Gespür für Ähnlichkeiten, Unterschiede und Vergleichbares herausgefordert. Erinnerungen an Berichte aus der Vergangenheit werden wach, der Wandel einzelner Lebensverhältnisse und Lebensvorstellungen wird plastisch; Berufsbilder, die sich verändert haben, ausgestorben oder ersetzt worden sind, treten vor Augen; die Umstellung gesellschaftlicher Vorgänge oder Ereignisse gewinnen Anschaulichkeit ebenso wie sich modifizierende Bildvorstellungen und künstlerisch ästhetische Ansprüche.

Doch abgesehen vom Verweischarakter, von der zeitgeschichtlichen Relevanz und der hohen Inspirationskraft von Sanders Photographien, die von namhaften Autoren wie Walter Benjamin, Alfred Döblin, Golo Mann und Kurt Tucholsky hervorgehoben wurden, zeigen die Bilder sehr konkrete Momente und sind im Einzelnen von bewundernswerter ästhetischer Qualität. Sie stellen Sanders Realitätssinn und sein Auge für spezifisch photographische, dokumentarische Naturtreue und adäquate Bildgestaltung unter Beweis. Dieser Qualität am Originalabzug aus August Sanders Hand nachzuspüren ist etwas besonders Kostbares und kann aufgrund konservatorischer Erfordernisse der sogenannten Vintages in großem Umfang nur selten geleistet werden.

August Sander selbst hat das Projekt "Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts" erstmals 1927 im Kölnischen Kunstverein vorgestellt. Seine Bildauswahl umfasste seinerzeit über 110 Blätter, die mit jetziger Präsentation jedoch weithin nicht identisch ist und auch nur bedingt überliefert ist, abgesehen davon, dass von einzelnen Motiven auch mehrere Abzüge kursier(t)en. Da Sander das Projekt oder – wie er es nannte – sein Kulturwerk "Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts" zwischen ca. 1925 und 1955, also über drei Jahrzehnte unter Rückgriff auch auf solche Motive erarbeitete, die ab 1892 entstanden waren, war sein Bestand an Originalabzügen und Bildmappen bis zu seinem Lebensende enorm gewachsen. In seinem Archiv bildet er sich gewissermaßen als ein Fundus ab, aus dem der Photograph für Ausstellungen und Publikationen frei schöpfte. Dies war in seiner Zeit ein einzigartig neues Vorgehen. Sanders Bewusstsein über die potenzierte Wirkungsweise von Bildreihen gegenüber Einzelbildern machte ihn ebenso zum Vorreiter der konzeptuellen Photographie wie sein entschiedener Einsatz einer unverfälscht klaren Wiedergabe der einzelnen Motive. Seine Porträts sollten seinen dokumentarischen Ansatz unterstreichen und ohne zusätzlich künstlerische Attitüden, aber nicht ohne eine fein justierte und zurückhaltende Gestaltung auskommen.

Das umfangreich angelegte Porträtwerk Sanders zielte darauf, einen Querschnitt der Bevölkerung aufzuzeigen, in dem sich die verschiedenen Berufs- und Gesellschaftstypen, verteilt auch auf die unterschiedlichen Generationen wiederfinden – einen Spiegel der Zeit. Im Titel Sanders ersten dazu 1929 erschienenen Buchs "Antlitz der Zeit" findet diese Intention ihr Echo. Sowohl dem mittelbar zum Ausdruck kommenden Gesicht der Zeit, als auch den einzelnen Physiognomien galt jahrzehntelang die ungebrochene Aufmerksamkeit des Photographen.

Um seinem wachsenden Kompendium Form und Gestalt zu geben, hat Sander Mitte der 1920er-Jahre ein Konzept erstellt, in dem er die von ihm in den Fokus genommenen Bildgruppen und -mappen weitgehend benannt hat. Die Gruppen heißen: "Der Bauer", "Der Handwerker", "Die Frau", "Die Stände", "Die Künstler", "Die Großstadt" und "Die letzten Menschen". Letztere vielleicht irreführende Bezeichnung steht für eine Bildreihe, die sehr respektvoll Menschen am Rande der Gesellschaft zeigt. Sanders damaligem Konzept, das eine Reihenfolge der Gruppen und Mappen vorschlägt, folgt auch die aktuelle Ausstellung unter Hinzuziehung einzelner oder mehrerer repräsentativen Mappenabzüge aus den entsprechenden Bildmappen.

Zum größten Teil stammen die Photographien aus dem Bestand des 1992 erworbenen August Sander Archivs, das den Grundstein für die weitere Entwicklung der Photographischen Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln, bildet. Dazu werden exklusive Leihgaben von Originalen hinzugezogen, so aus der Berlinischen Galerie, Museum für Moderne Kunst, Berlin, dem J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, dem Museum Ludwig Köln, dem Museum of Modern Art, New York und der Pinakothek der Moderne, München ebenso wie aus wichtigen Privatsammlungen.

Im Schirmer/Mosel Verlag ist zeitgleich zur Ausstellung in deutscher und englischer Ausgabe das Buch "August Sander – Meisterwerke" entstanden. Erstmals in der Publikationsgeschichte des Photographen werden darin die Originalabzüge in authentischer Tonalität, außerdem in ursprünglicher Ausschnittwiedergabe abgebildet. Digitale Daten, durch Scannen der Originale gewonnen, wurden vielfach abgestimmt und vierfarbig gedruckt. Der in die Publikation einbezogene Text von Gabriele Conrath-Scholl gibt einen vertieften Einblick in die Entwicklungsgeschichte von "Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts" und setzt den Diskurs über das Werk von August Sander fort, das im Münchner Verlagsprogramm seit 1975 mit Herausgabe von Sanders "Rheinlandschaften" und weiteren zahlreichen Titeln eine zentrale Rolle spielt.

Masterworks – Photographs from "People of the 20th Century"
August Sander
Zirkusarbeiter / Circus Worker, 1926-1932
© Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur – August Sander Archiv; VG Bild-Kunst, 2018
Masterworks – Photographs from "People of the 20th Century"
August Sander
Der Dadaist Raoul Hausmann [mit Hedwig Mankiewitz und Vera Broïdo] / The Dadaist Raoul Hausmann [with Hedwig Mankiewitz and Vera Broïdo], 1929
© Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur – August Sander Archiv; VG Bild-Kunst, 2018