Hier können Sie die Auswahl einschränken.
Wählen Sie einfach die verschiedenen Kriterien aus.
Poetry of Plants
Jim Dine: Entrada Drive, 2001-2003
© Jim Dine, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019
courtesy Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln

Poetry of Plants

Poesie der Pflanze

Karl Blossfeldt » Jim Dine »

Exhibition: 22 Feb – 21 Jul 2019

Thu 21 Feb 19:00

Die Photographische Sammlung / SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln

Im Mediapark 7
50670 Köln

+49 (0)221-88895300


www.photographie-sk-kultur.de

Thu-Tue 14-19

Poetry of Plants
Karl Blossfeldt: Heliotrope. Inflorescence, n. d.
© Courtesy Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln
in Kooperation mit der Sammlung Karl Blossfeldt in der Universität der Künste, Berlin
Universitätsarchiv, 2019

"Poetry of Plants"
Photographs by Karl Blossfeldt and Jim Dine


Exhibition: February 22 – July 21, 2019 (in Room 1)
Opening: Thursday, 21 February, 7pm

Nature continually beguiles us with its wonders – the proliferating vegetation with myriad plant species and forms, their spatial disposition, the light that plays across them and the overall effect – and capturing them photographically is at the heart of the exhibition. The works on view manifest close observation and sensitive perception of flora and the verdant environment as documented with the camera, while also encouraging us to look attentively at photographic images crafted by two very different artists. It’s a question of reality and its interpretation.

The works of Karl Blossfeldt (1865–1932) and Jim Dine (b. 1935) provide a compelling springboard for examining this question. Even though the two artists are generations apart and represent very different artistic approaches, their works make it clear that the mystery of nature, its magic as well as its regularity and order, is a never-ending source of creative inspiration. Blossfeldt and Dine are united by their love of nature, their nuanced engagement with their pictorial subjects, and also the painstaking precision of their photographic compositions.

Karl Blossfeldt, who is represented in the exhibition by over 70 original photographs made into gelatin silver prints, pursued photography as part of his teaching activities at the Unterrichtsanstalt des Königlichen Kunstgewerbemuseums (Institute of the Royal Arts & Crafts Museum) in Berlin. Born in Schielo (Harz, Saxony-Anhalt), Blossfeldt studied at the institute between 1884/85 and 1888 and subsequently worked as a modeler in the bronze workshop.

The year 1898 is thought to mark the beginning of his photographic activity, because Blossfeldt started that year to use photographs in his art teaching as models for handcrafted pieces and individual drawings. Photographic images not only enabled him to present to his students the plant material he had collected in the environs of Berlin in a freshly documented state – rather than trying to use quickly-wilting natural plants – it also let him magnify their smallest details and occasionally show his specimens in a specially prepared and arranged form. Blossfeldt focused on the fascination of nature’s formal repertoire, which he demonstrated in his photographs with the greatest of precision. He typically showcased the form of a particular plant before a flat, neutral background. In this respect, he used one of the purest forms of pictorial composition, zeroing in on the relevant subject matter in quasi-scientific fashion.

Blossfeldt’s rise to fame was launched by an exhibition of his photographs in Berlin in 1926 by the gallerist Karl Nierendorf, who showed them alongside sculptures from Africa and New Guinea. In 1928 Blossfeldt published his groundbreaking book Urformen der Kunst (Art Forms in Nature), and at the beginning of 1932 Wundergarten der Natur (The Magic Garden of Nature). Karl Blossfeldt died on December 3, 1932, in Berlin. Today he is one of the most renowned artists and photographers of the twentieth century. Along with August Sander and Albert Renger-Patzsch, Blossfeldt ranks as one of the key figures of the New Vision movement in photography.

The exhibition "Poetry of Plants" presents Blossfeldt’s works in conjunction with around 40 heliogravures by the American artist Jim Dine. They are larger in size and explore the lyrical aspect of the plant world in a manner that is formally remote from Blossfeldt’s approach and yet still related in some ways. In both cases we encounter a highly intense examination of the subject with the camera used to capture its details, as well as the integration of the individual images into an insightful series.

Jim Dine, who is at home in many different artistic media, whether painting, sculpture, printmaking, literature, or poetry, first made a name for himself on New York’s Pop Art scene in the late 1950s. He is well-known today mostly for motifs such as bathrobes, heart shapes, paint palettes, brushes, and tools. But nature’s creations have also been a consuming interest for the artist, as is evident from his many depictions of trees, branches, and flowers and their inclusion in his installations. As early as 1969, he already made a portfolio of Vegetables, his earliest work dealing with botanical forms and colors. Dine’s passion for nature and the plant world is likewise reflected in the Entrada Drive series of heliogravures from the early 2000s that is on display in the exhibition. These works are presented for the first time in Europe and have at all only been exhibited once at New York’s University Museum "Neuberger Museum of Art".

They date back to a working stay in Los Angeles in the winter of 2001, when the artist took up residence on Entrada Drive with his wife, Diana Michener. What he would remember most was the peculiar atmospheric light, which felt to him like a "gray July." The heliogravures based on photographs Dine took in LA accordingly have a somber tonality in some cases.

These are interspersed in the show with photos the artist took in botanical gardens in Berlin and New York. In contrast to Blossfeldt, Jim Dine looks beyond the individual plant forms at the broader picture, at scenes brimming with vegetation, bushes, and shrubbery. With their finely calibrated gray tones, his heliogravures betray a long and elaborate process. These are handmade works, based on photographs – in this case medium-format black-and-white negatives – that are converted to slides in the original size of the planned heliogravures and exposed in contact with light-sensitive, gelatin-coated copper plates.

The idea of bringing together works by Karl Blossfeldt and Jim Dine was inspired by research into the collection’s own archives. The presentation of works by Karl Blossfeldt is based on twenty years of close cooperation between Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur and Berlin University of the Arts, which owns over 600 of Blossfeldt’s original prints along with other material. A large number of these works are on long-term loan to Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, and these are sometimes exchanged with or supplemented by holdings from the university and featured in exhibitions or publications.

In 2009 an annotated catalogue raisonné was compiled of the entire Blossfeldt collection, accessible on the website of Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur (www.photographie-sk-kultur.de).

The presentation of Jim Dine’s Entrada Drive series of heliogravures draws on an extensive collection of approximately 1,500 photographic works that the artist has entrusted to the care of Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur in 2005. This is the fourth exhibition that the institution has dedicated to the artist.

Poetry of Plants
Jim Dine: Entrada Drive, 2001-2003
© Jim Dine, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019
courtesy Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln

"Poesie der Pflanze"
Photographien von Karl Blossfeldt und Jim Dine


Ausstellung: 22. Februar bis 21. Juli 2019 (in Raum 1)
Eröffnung: Donnerstag, 21. Februar, 19 Uhr

Die immer wieder neu zu entdeckende Natur, die Vegetation mit ihren vielzähligen Gewächsen und Formen, ihre räumliche Disposition, das sie umspielende Licht ebenso wie die übergreifende Wirkung all dessen bilden das Zentrum der Ausstellung. Es geht einerseits um das Sehen, das Beobachten und empfindsame Wahrnehmen von Pflanzen und Pflanzenwelten, dokumentiert via Kamera; andererseits um ein achtsames Anschauen photographischer Bilder, gefertigt aus der Hand zweier Künstler. Es geht um Realität und Interpretation.

Die Werke von Karl Blossfeldt (1865–1932) und Jim Dine (*1935) setzen in diesem Sinn starke Impulse. Auch wenn beide auf verschiedene künstlerische Richtungen und Generationen zurückgehen, so wird doch in ihren Arbeiten deutlich, dass das Geheimnis der Natur, ihr Zauber ebenso wie ihre Regelmäßigkeit und Ordnung eine für die schöpferische Arbeit nicht versiegende Quelle ist. Beide Künstler verbindet die Liebe zur Natur, die differenzierte Auseinandersetzung mit ihrem Bildgegenstand ebenso wie ihre Präzision in der Umsetzung ihrer photographischen Kompositionen.

Karl Blossfeldt, von dem in der Ausstellung über 70 originale Photographien, umgesetzt als Gelatinesilberabzüge, gezeigt werden, erarbeitete seine Ansichten vor dem Hintergrund seiner Lehrtätigkeit an der Unterrichtsanstalt des Königlichen Kunstgewerbemuseums, Berlin. Dort hatte der in Schielo (Harz, Sachsen-Anhalt) geborene Blossfeldt zwischen 1884/85 und 1888 studiert und in Folge als Modelleur in der Bronzewerkstatt gearbeitet.

Das Jahr 1898 gilt als der eigentliche Beginn seiner photographischen Tätigkeit, denn Blossfeldt nutzte die von ihm erarbeiteten Photographien im Kunstunterricht zur Erarbeitung kunsthandwerklicher Stücke und individueller Zeichenentwürfe. Mittels photographischem Abbild konnte er seinen Studenten das von ihm in der Umgebung Berlins gesammelte Pflanzenmaterial nicht nur in quasi frisch dokumentiertem Zustand vor Augen führen – natürliche Pflanzen welkten und veränderten sich oft zu schnell –, sondern er konnte die Pflanzenteile in vielfach vergrößerter Auflösung und gelegentlich in von ihm fokussierter und spezifisch präparierter Gestalt zeigen.

Blossfeldts Intention richtete sich vor allem auf die Besonderheit der einzelnen, ihn faszinierenden Formen, die er in aller Präzision herausarbeitete. Typisch für die Photographien von Karl Blossfeldt ist, dass er die Gestalt der Pflanze vor einem flächig neutralen Hintergrund freistellte. Insofern griff er zu einer der puristischsten Möglichkeiten einer Bildkomposition, die dem quasi wissenschaftlichen Aufzeigen anvisierter Gegebenheiten dient.

Blossfeldts Ruhm begann mit der 1926 von Galerist Karl Nierendorf in Berlin ausgerichteten Ausstellung seiner Photographien gemeinsam mit Skulpturen aus Afrika und Neuguinea. 1928 veröffentlichte Blossfeldt seine bahnbrechende Publikation Urformen der Kunst, zu Beginn des Jahres 1932 folgte Wundergarten der Natur. Am 3. Dezember 1932 verstarb Karl Blossfeldt in Berlin. Heute gehört er zu den anerkanntesten Künstlern und Photographen des 20. Jahrhunderts. Ebenso wie die Arbeiten von August Sander und Albert Renger-Patzsch zählen die Pflanzenansichten Blossfeldts zu den entscheidenden Werken der Neuen Sachlichkeit in der Photographie.

Die Ausstellung "Poesie der Pflanze" stellt den Arbeiten Blossfeldts etwa 40 Heliogravüren des amerikanischen Künstlers Jim Dine gegenüber. Sie sind größeren Formats und nähern sich der poetischen Wirkung der Pflanzenwelt in formal anderer und doch verwandter Weise. Hier wie da treffen wir auf eine höchst intensive Auseinandersetzung mit dem Bildgegenstand und der davon im Einzelnen auszuführenden Photographie gleichwie deren Einbindung in eine aufschlussreich weiterführende Bildreihe.

Jim Dine, der in vielen verschiedenen künstlerischen Medien, sei es der Malerei, der Bildhauerei, der Druckgraphik, auch der Literatur und Lyrik Zuhause ist, wurde Ende der 1950er-Jahre im Kontext der Pop-Art-Szene in New York berühmt. Vor allem seine Werke, die Motive wie Bademäntel, Herzformen, Farbpaletten, Pinsel und Werkzeuge zeigen, sind heute einem großen Publikum bekannt. Aber auch das von der Natur Geschaffene erwarb sein unentwegtes Interesse, wie die Darstellungen und installativen Einbeziehungen von Bäumen, Ästen und Blumen verdeutlichen. Bereits 1969 entstand Dines Portfolio Vegetables, seine früheste Arbeit, die sich mit botanischen Formen und Farben auseinandersetzt.

Jim Dines Leidenschaft für die Natur und Pflanzenwelt zeigt sich auch in der aktuell vorgestellten Reihe Entrada Drive mit Heliogravüren, die zu Beginn der 2000er-Jahre entstanden. Dieses Konvolut wird nun zum ersten Mal in Europa präsentiert und wurde überhaupt erst einmal in dem New Yorker Universitätsmuseum "Neuberger Museum of Modern Art"" ausgestellt. Die Arbeiten gehen auf einen Arbeitsaufenthalt in Los Angeles im Winter 2001 zurück, als der Künstler gemeinsam mit seiner Frau Diana Michener auf dem Entrada Drive wohnte. Insbesondere das eigenwillige Licht blieb ihm nachhaltig in Erinnerung, er empfand es wie in einem "grauen Juli". Entsprechend gehen die ausgestellten, teils dunkeltonigen Heliogravüren auf Photographien zurück, die in L.A. entstanden, doch auch Aufnahmen aus botanischen Gärten, die der Künstler in Berlin und New York besuchte, mischen sich unter.

Im Gegensatz zu Blossfeldt richtet sich Jim Dines Aufmerksamkeit über die einzelne Gestalt der Pflanze hinaus, mehr noch auf den Raum, in dem er die Pflanzen, Büsche und Gesträuche antrifft und erlebt. Die von Jim Dine vorgestellten Heliogravüren wirken durch ihre besonders austarierten Grauwerte auf feinzeichnender Papierqualität, als Ergebnis eines längeren Erarbeitungsprozesses. Es sind in Handarbeit gefertigte Werke, die auf Grundlage einer Photographie – im speziellen Fall gehen sie auf schwarzweiße Negative im Mittelformat zurück – als Diapositive in Originalgröße der geplanten Heliogravüren gewandelt und im Kontakt mit lichtempfindlichen, gelatinebeschichteten Kupferplatten belichtet wurden.

Die Zusammenführung und Gegenüberstellung der beiden künstlerischen Positionen von Karl Blossfeldt und Jim Dine ist aus der Betreuung der internen Archivbestände hervorgegangen. So basiert einerseits die Präsentation der Werke von Karl Blossfeldt auf der engen, inzwischen 20-jährigen Zusammenarbeit zwischen der Photographischen Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur und der Universität der Künste Berlin, zu deren Eigentum ein Blossfeldt-Konvolut von u. a. über 600 Originalabzügen zählt. Ein umfangreicher Teil dieser Arbeiten befindet sich als langfristige Leihgabe im Bestand der Photographischen Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, wird zuweilen mit Berliner Universitätsbeständen gewechselt oder ergänzt und in Ausstellungen oder Publikationen veröffentlicht. 2009 entstand zum Gesamtbestand des betreffenden Blossfeldt-Konvoluts ein wissenschaftlich kommentiertes Werkverzeichnis, das auf der Homepage der Photographischen Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur einsehbar ist (www.photographie-sk-kultur.de).

Mit der Präsentation der Reihe Entrada Drive von Jim Dine bezieht sich die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur auf ein umfangreiches Konvolut, das der Künstler 2005 in die Obhut der Institution übertragen hat. Es ist die vierte Ausstellung, die die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur dem photographischen Schaffen des Künstlers widmet, das im hauseigenen Sammlungsbestand mit ca. 1500 Arbeiten vertreten ist.

Poetry of Plants
Karl Blossfeldt: Christmas rose, Young flower shoot, tenfold magnification, n. d.
© Courtesy Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln
in Kooperation mit der Sammlung Karl Blossfeldt in der Universität der Künste, Berlin
Universitätsarchiv, 2019
Poetry of Plants
Jim Dine: Entrada Drive, 2001-2003
© Jim Dine, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019
courtesy Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln
Poetry of Plants
Karl Blossfeldt: Pineapple. Fruit spike, n. d.
© Courtesy Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur, Köln
in Kooperation mit der Sammlung Karl Blossfeldt in der Universität der Künste, Berlin
Universitätsarchiv, 2019