Hier können Sie die Auswahl einschränken.
Wählen Sie einfach die verschiedenen Kriterien aus.

eNews

X





Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022
Jo Ractliffe, Video club, Roque Santeiro market, 2007 from the series Terreno Ocupado © Jo Ractliffe, Courtesy of the artist

Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022

Deana Lawson » Gilles Peress » Jo Ractliffe » Anastasia Samoylova »

Exhibition: – 12 Jun 2022

The Photographers' Gallery

16 - 18 Ramillies Street
W1F 7LW London

+44 (0)845-2621618


www.thephotographersgallery.org.uk

Tue-Sat 11-19

Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022
Anastasia Samoylova, Pink Sidewalk, 2017, from the series FloodZone

Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022 shortlist announced

The four artists shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022 are Deana Lawson, Gilles Peress, Jo Ractliffe and Anastasia Samoylova.

Originally established in 1996, the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation has been awarding this long-standing and influential annual prize in partnership with The Photographers' Gallery in London since 2016. The prize identifies and rewards artists and projects considered to have made the most significant contribution to photography over the previous 12 months. Over its 26-year history, the prize has become renowned as one of the most important awards for photographers as well as a barometer of photographic development, foregrounding outstanding, innovative and thought-provoking work that pushes the boundaries of the medium and exemplifies its resonance and relevance as a cultural force.

This year's shortlist is no exception, with each artist offering very distinctive approaches to visual storytelling, while collectively tackling some of the most urgent issues facing us today. Despite the difference in perspectives (generational, geographical, racial, cultural) and artistic strategies, each of the shortlisted artists show an acute awareness of their present context, of the burden of history, the problematics of legacy and language (visual or otherwise) and a responsibility to address their own position in relation to their subject matter.

The exhibition of the shortlisted projects will be on show at The Photographers' Gallery, London from 25 March to 12 June 2022. The exhibition will then travel to the Deutsche Börse's headquarters in Eschborn/Frankfurt and be on display from 30 June 2022.

The winner of the £30,000 prize will be announced at an award ceremony held at The Photographers' Gallery on 12 May 2022 with the other finalists each receiving £5,000 – an increase from previous years when the award fund was £3,000 each.

Full details on the prize exhibition and award evening will be announced in 2022.


The 2022 shortlisted artists and projects are:

Deana Lawson is shortlisted for her exhibition "Centropy" at Kunsthalle, Basel (9 June – 11 October 2020).

An exhibition of photographs, mostly large-scale and spanning 2013 – 2020, 16mm projections, rock crystals and holograms arrayed in a dense constellation, "Centropy" conveys immediacy and immanence. Deana Lawson (b. 1979, Rochester, New York) evokes the language of the vernacular family photo album and the art-historical masterwork in meticulously choreographed portraits that are at once familiar and painterly. The richly textured domestic settings are embellished with uncanny details; peeling wallpaper and tired couches, but also the destabilizing presence of devotional objects and what the artist refers to as 'portals'. 'I'm actually trying to image the mythic realm', Lawson explains, 'to use the person as a vehicle to represent an entity beyond what is actually present'.


Gilles Peress is shortlisted for the publication "Whatever You Say, Say Nothing", published by Steidl, 2021.

Gilles Peress (b. 1946, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) first travelled to Northern Ireland in the 1970s, after the reintroduction of internment in 1971, and prior to and during the Bloody Sunday massacre in 1972. He returned in the 1980s with the intention of describing everything as a way of testing the limits of visual language to record and understand the intractable conflict. The resulting publication, "Whatever You Say, Say Nothing", is a work of monumental achievement and complexity. Across 2,000 pages, two volumes of images, and an accompanying almanac of contextual material, Peress presents a 'documentary fiction'. A decade of photographs is organised across 22 'semi-fictional days': Days of Struggle, Day of Internment, Double Cross Days, but also days where nothing happens ... boring days, days that never end. "Whatever You Say, Say Nothing" delineates the helicoidal structure of history, 'where today is not only today but all the days like today'. It describes existence and experience in a space ritualised by recurring violence, while striving for the savage nature of photography that exists in the no man's land beyond accepted forms.


Jo Ractliffe is shortlisted for her publication "Photographs 1980s – now", published by Steidl/The Walther Collection, 2021.

For more than three decades, South African photographer Jo Ractliffe (b. 1961, Cape Town, South Africa) has trained her lens on the landscape of her homeland. Her nominated project is the comprehensive monograph "Photographs 1980s – now", which comprises major photoessays, early works and newly published images, steeped in literary reference. Presented chronologically, and introduced by the artist's direct, almost diaristic, texts, Ractliffe's images bear witness to the complexities of a country scarified by the violence of Apartheid, as well as the aftermath of civil war in neighbouring Angola. These stark images are set apart from social documentary. Ractliffe is drawn to quiet poetics, not direct political address. Decommissioned military outposts, makeshift dwellings stalked by stray dogs; her distinctive visual language is marked by desolation and absence. As sites of massacre, forced removal and violence, these images are neither silent nor empty. A signature style is observed in "Photographs 1980s – now", with favoured techniques, such as 'filmstrip'-like sequences or photographing with plastic and toy cameras, used by Ractliffe to capture life – or its lack – on the open road. Though black-and-white images predominate, there are also important forays into colour photography and experiments with photomontage and video.


Anastasia Samoylova is shortlisted for her exhibition "FloodZone" at the Multimedia Art Museum, Moscow (8 June - 28 July 2021).

"FloodZone" is an expansive and ongoing photographic series, responding to environmental changes in America's coastal cities, with a particular focus on Florida, where the artist has lived since 2016. Anastasia Samoylova (b. 1984, Moscow, Russia) finds herself between paradise and catastrophe, but her record of climate crisis is less inclined to direct reportage than lyrical evocation. The colour palette is tropical and pastel-pretty, but there is peril too – rot, wear and decay. Samoylova pays particular attention to the proliferation of aspirational imagery that forms the region's official iconography, but which exists in stark contrast to the realities of encroaching environmental disaster. From aerial views of saturated topography to close-up observations of architecture, displaced fauna and resilient flora, Samoylova captures the 'seductive and destructive dissonance' of a region deeply invested in its own image and sunny allure, while dangerously impacted by rising sea levels, storm surges and coastal erosion, brought about by climate change.

The 2022 Jury and statements

This year's jury are: Yto Barrada, artist, Jessica Dimson, The New York Times Deputy Director of Photography, Yasufumi Nakamori, Tate Modern's International Art (Photography) Senior Curator, Anne-Marie Beckmann, Director of the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation, and Brett Rogers, OBE, Director of The Photographers' Gallery, as voting chair.

Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers' Gallery:

"The work of this year's nominees encapsulates themes which reflect not only the current times we live in, but the weight and responsibility of history and embrace two very different standpoints. That of a younger generation (Deana Lawson and Anastasia Samoylova) who are making a major impact within the photography world due to the distinctive ways in which they use the medium to interrogate and explore topical issues; alongside an older generation (Giles Peress and Jo Ractliffe) who demonstrate a long-term engagement (40 years +) with, and commitment, both subject and medium. Despite what might be conceived to be the harrowing thread connecting the subjects they deal with (conflict in Northern Ireland, the representation of the black body in visual culture, the impact of climate change in Florida or the trauma of post-apartheid Africa), each artist manages to propose moments of epiphany or revelation. Taken together, this year's shortlist demonstrates that even in the darkness of our current world, artists still find a way to reveal hidden truths and make us look afresh at the world - a testimony to photography's ability to offer us invaluable ways to reconsider and review our perspectives."


Anne-Marie Beckmann, Director, Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation:

"Every year, as we go through the almost impossible task of selecting just four artists and projects for the annual prize shortlist, I am reminded afresh – not only of the extraordinary capacity of photography to encompass such a breadth of approaches and perspectives – but also of its unique ability to spark such varied, impassioned and essential debate. The jury session was especially notable for the quantity and quality of discussion, which had us considering not only the merits of the individual projects, but the nature, meaning and status of photography at this particular and peculiar point in time. I think for all of us, the richness of opinion only strengthened our belief in the intrinsic value of medium, and therefore for this prize, which continues to keep photography at the forefront of public attention and champion
its significance socially, politically and creatively. It is an immense privilege to be part of it and yet again to present a shortlist that works with photography in such interesting and different ways and offers such depth of subject-matter and perspective."



Media contacts:
Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation:

Oliver Frischemeier
+49 (0) 160 9759 1329


The Photographers' Gallery
Grace Gabriele-Tighe or Sofia Desbois at Margaret PR on or


Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation
The Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation is a Frankfurt-based non-profit organisation. The foundation activities focus on collecting, exhibiting, and promoting contemporary photography. Deutsche Börse began to build up its collection of contemporary photography in 1999. The Art Collection Deutsche Börse now comprises more than 2,200 works by over 140 artists from 32 nations. The collection and a changing exhibition programme are open to the public. Together with The Photographers' Gallery in London, the foundation awards the renowned Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize each year. The promotion of young artists is a special concern of the foundation. It supports them in the form of awards, scholarships, exhibitions and cooperations with other institutions, such as the Foam Talents Programme of the Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam. Other focal points include supporting exhibition projects of international museums and institutions, and the expansion of platforms for academic discussion about the medium.
www.deutscheboersephotographyfoundation.org


The Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize History
Founded in 1996 by The Photographers' Gallery, and now in its twenty sixth year, the Prize has become one of the most prestigious international arts awards and has launched and established the careers of many photographers over the years. Previously known as the Citigroup Photography Prize, the Gallery has been in collaboration with Deutsche Börse Group since 2005. In 2016 the Prize was retitled the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize following the establishment of the
foundation as a non-profit organisation dedicated to the collection, exhibition, and promotion of contemporary photography. The winner of the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2021 was Cao Fei for her exhibition Blueprints. Past winners have include: Mohamed Bourouissa, Susan Meiselas, Luke Willis Thompson, Dana Lixenberg, Trevor Paglen, Juergen Teller, Rineke Dijkstra, Richard Billingham, John Stezaker and Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin.


The Photographers' Gallery
The Photographers' Gallery opened in 1971 in Covent Garden, London, as the UK's first independent and publicly funded gallery devoted to photography. It was the first UK gallery to exhibit many key names in international photography, including Juergen Teller, Robert Capa, Sebastiano Salgado and Andreas Gursky. The Gallery has also been instrumental in establishing contemporary British photographers, including Martin Parr and Corinne Day. In 2009 the Gallery relocated to a new multistorey
building in Ramillies Street, Soho and opened its doors to the public in 2012 after an
ambitious redevelopment plan which provided the Gallery with three floors of state-of-the-art exhibition space as well as an education/events studio, a gallery for commercial sales, bookshop and cafe. The success of The Photographers' Gallery over the past four decades has helped to secure the medium's position as a vital and highly regarded art form, introducing new audiences to photography and championing its place at the heart of visual culture.
www.thephotographersgallery.org.uk


Social media
Instagram: @dboersephotographyfoundation
Facebook: @DeutscheBoersePhotographyFoundation

Instagram: @thephotographersgallery
Twitter: @TPGallery
Facebook: @ThePhotographersGalleryLDN

Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022
Deana Lawson, Chief, 2019 © Deana Lawson, Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York; David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles

Finalist*innen des Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022 bekannt gegeben


Die vier Finalist*innen des Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022 sind Deana Lawson, Gilles Peress, Jo Ractliffe und Anastasia Samoylova.

Die Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation vergibt den 1996 ins Leben gerufenen und einflussreichen Preis jährlich in Partnerschaft mit der Photographers' Gallery in London. Mit dem Preis werden Künstler*innen und Projekte ausgezeichnet, die in den vergangenen 12 Monaten den bedeutendsten Beitrag zur Fotografie geleistet haben. In seiner 26-jährigen Geschichte ist der Prize zu einer der international renommiertesten Auszeichnungen für Fotograf*innen geworden. Zugleich ist er ein wichtiger Wegweiser für die Entwicklungen des Mediums Fotografie. Er ehrt herausragende, innovative und kritische Arbeiten, die die Grenzen des fotografischen Mediums erweitern und dessen Einfluss und Relevanz als kulturelle Kraft deutlich machen.

Die diesjährige Shortlist bildet in dieser Hinsicht keine Ausnahme: Die ausgewählten Künstler*innen verfolgen unterschiedlichste Ansätze des visuellen Geschichtenerzählens. Sie beschäftigen sich allesamt mit einigen der dringlichsten Fragen unserer Zeit. Trotz der vielfältigen Perspektiven (generationenbezogen, geografisch, ethnisch und kulturell) und künstlerischen Strategien gibt es elementare Gemeinsamkeiten. Sie zeigen alle ein ausgeprägtes Bewusstsein für die Gegenwart, historische Belastungen, die Problematik des Vermächtnisses und der Sprache sowie für die Verantwortung, sich in Bezug zum jeweiligen Thema mit dem eigenen Standpunkt auseinanderzusetzen.

Die Ausstellung der Finalist*innen wird vom 25. März bis 12. Juni 2022 in der Photographers' Gallery, London, zu sehen sein. Im Anschluss daran tourt die Ausstellung zur Konzernzentrale der Deutschen Börse nach Frankfurt/Eschborn und kann dort ab dem 30. Juni 2022 besucht werden.

Der*die Gewinner*in der Auszeichnung wird im Rahmen einer Preisverleihung am 12. Mai 2022 in der Photographers' Gallery, London, bekanntgegeben und erhält 30.000 £ als Preisgeld. Die anderen drei Finalist*innen erhalten jeweils 5.000 £ – eine Erhöhung gegenüber den Vorjahren, als das Preisgeld bei 3.000 £ lag.

Weitere Informationen zur Prize-Ausstellung und zur Verleihung werden im Laufe des Jahres 2022 bekanntgegeben.


Die Finalist*innen 2022 und ihre Projekte sind:

Deana Lawson wurde für ihre Ausstellung "Centropy" in der Kunsthalle Basel (9. Juni bis 11. Oktober 2020) ausgewählt.

"Centropy" zeigt großformatige Fotografien aus den Jahren 2013 bis 2020, 16mm-Filme, Hologramme und Bergkristalle, die als dichtes Ensemble Direktheit und Immanenz vermitteln. Deana Lawson (*1979, Rochester, New York) beschwört die Sprache des typischen Fotoalbums und des kunsthistorischen Meisterwerks in sorgfältig choreografierten Porträts herauf, die zugleich intim wie malerisch anmuten. Ihre üppig ausgestatteten Privaträume sind mit Details ausgestattet, die unheimlich anmuten. Dazu gehören sich lösende Tapeten und abgenutzte Schlafcouches, aber auch die beunruhigende Anwesenheit von Devotionalien und dem, was die Künstlerin als "Portale" bezeichnet. "Ich versuche eigentlich, das Reich des Mythischen abzubilden", erklärt Lawson, "eine Person als Vehikel zu benutzen, um ein Wesen jenseits dessen darzustellen, was tatsächlich vorhanden ist."


Gilles Peress wurde für seine 2021 im Steidl Verlag erschienene Publikation "Whatever You Say, Say Nothing" ausgewählt.

Gilles Peress (*1946, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) reiste erstmals in den 1970er Jahren nach Nordirland: 1971 nach der Wiedereinführung von Internierungen durch die Regierung und 1972 vor und während des Massakers am "Bloody Sunday". In den 1980er Jahren kehrte er mit der Absicht zurück, den scheinbar unlösbaren Konflikt durch das Ausloten der Grenzen von visueller Sprache zu erfassen und zu verstehen. Die daraus resultierende Publikation "Whatever You Say, Say Nothing" ist in ihrer Komplexität ein herausragendes Werk. Auf 2.000 Seiten – zwei Bildbänden und einem begleitenden Almanach mit Kontextmaterial – legt Peress eine "dokumentarische Fiktion" vor. Ein fotografiertes Jahrzehnt wird in 22 "halb-fiktive Tage" gegliedert: Tage des Kampfes, Tage der Internierung, Tage des Doppelkreuzes, aber auch Tage, an denen gar nichts passiert … langweilige Tage, Tage, die nie aufhören. "Whatever You Say, Say Nothing" umreißt präzise die spiralförmige Struktur der Geschichte, "wo heute nicht nur heute ist, sondern alle Tage wie heute". Es beschreibt Existenz und Erfahrung in einem Raum, der durch wiederkehrende Gewalt ritualisiert wird, und strebt gleichzeitig nach der ungezähmten Natur der Fotografie im Niemandsland, jenseits der anerkannten Formen.


Jo Ractliffe wurde für ihre 2021 bei Steidl/The Walther Collection erschienene Publikation "Photographs 1980s – now" ausgewählt.

Über mehr als drei Jahrzehnte hat die südafrikanische Fotografin Jo Ractliffe (*1961, Kapstadt, Südafrika) ihr Objektiv auf die Landschaft ihrer Heimat gerichtet. Ihr nominiertes Projekt, die umfassende Monografie "Photographs 1980s – now", umfasst wichtige Fotoreportagen, frühe Arbeiten und erst jüngst veröffentlichte Bilder, die voller literarischer Bezüge stecken. Chronologisch präsentiert und eingeleitet durch persönliche, fast an Tagebucheinträge erinnernde Texte der Künstlerin, zeugen Ractliffes Bilder von den Verwicklungen eines Landes, das ebenso von der Gewalt der Apartheid gezeichnet ist wie von den Folgen des Bürgerkriegs im benachbarten Angola. Diese rauen, schonungslosen Bilder unterscheiden sich von sozialdokumentarischer Fotografie: Ractliffe zieht es eher zu einer leisen Poetik als zur unmittelbar politischen Ansprache. Ausgemusterte Militärvorposten, provisorische Behausungen, die von streunenden Hunden heimgesucht werden – ihre unverwechselbare Bildsprache ist von Trostlosigkeit und Abwesenheit gekennzeichnet. Als Schauplätze von Massakern, Zwangsabschiebungen und Gewalt sind diese Bilder jedoch weder still noch leer. Man findet in "Photographs 1980s – now" wiederkehrende charakteristische Stilmittel: filmstreifenartige Sequenzen etwa, die Beobachtung des Lebens – oder seines Fehlens – von der offenen Straße aus sowie das wiederholte Verwenden von Plastik- und Spielzeugkameras. Obwohl Schwarz-Weiß-Bilder überwiegen, existieren auch bedeutsame Streifzüge in die Farbfotografie und Experimente mit Fotomontage und Video.


Anastasia Samoylova wurde für ihre Ausstellung "FloodZone" am Multimedia Art Museum, Moskau (8. Juni bis 28. Juli 2021) ausgewählt.

"FloodZone" ist eine umfangreiche und fortlaufende fotografische Serie, die sich mit den Umweltveränderungen in den Küstenstädten Amerikas – insbesondere in Florida – auseinandersetzt, wo die Künstlerin seit 2016 lebt. Anastasia Samoylova (*1984, Moskau, Russland) bewegt sich hier an Orten zwischen Paradies und Katastrophe; ihre Aufzeichnungen der Klimakrise sind jedoch weniger unmittelbare Reportage als lyrische Beschwörung. Die Farbpalette reicht dabei von tropisch bis pastellig-schön, kennt aber auch die Gefahr – Verwesung, Abnutzung und Zerfall. Samoylovas besonderes Augenmerk liegt auf der Verbreitung einer ambitionierten Metaphorik, die die offizielle Ikonografie der Region bildet, jedoch in krassem Gegensatz zu den Realitäten der sich immer weiter ausbreitenden Umweltkatastrophe steht. Von Luftaufnahmen, die etwas von der durchtränkten Topografie vermitteln, bis hin zu Nahaufnahmen von Architektur, vertriebener Tierwelt und unverwüstlicher Flora fängt Samoylova die "verführerische und zerstörerische Dissonanz" einer Gegend ein, die massiv in ihr eigenes Image und ihren sonnigen Zauber investiert hat, während sie gleichzeitig in zunehmend bedrohlichem Ausmaß vom steigenden Meeresspiegel, von Sturmfluten und Küstenerosion – allesamt durch den Klimawandel hervorgerufen – betroffen ist.



Die Jury und ihre Begründungen 2022

Die diesjährige Jury setzt sich zusammen aus: Yto Barrada, Künstlerin, Jessica Dimson, Stellvertretende Direktorin für Fotografie des New York Times Magazine, Yasufumi Nakamori, Leitender Kurator für Internationale Kunst (Fotografie) an der Tate Modern, Anne-Marie Beckmann, Direktorin der Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation, sowie Brett Rogers, OBE, Direktorin der Photographers' Gallery, als stimmberechtigte Vorsitzende.

Brett Rogers, Direktorin, The Photographers' Gallery:

"Die Arbeiten der diesjährigen Finalist*innen behandeln Themen, die nicht nur die unmittelbare Gegenwart widerspiegeln, in der wir leben, sondern auch das enorme Gewicht und die Verantwortung der Geschichte. Dabei sind zwei unterschiedliche Perspektiven vertreten: Die Perspektive einer jüngeren Generation (Deana Lawson und Anastasia Samoylova), die erst seit kurzem durch die besondere Art und Weise, in der sie das Medium nutzt, um aktuelle Sachverhalte zu hinterfragen und zu erforschen, großen Eindruck in der Welt der Fotografie hinterlassen hat, und die einer älteren Generation (Gilles Peress und Jo Ractliffe), die sich seit mehr als 30 oder 40 Jahren sowohl mit einem Thema als auch dem Medium beschäftigt. Trotz der erschütternden Themen, die ihren Werken zugrunde liegen (der Nordirland-Konflikt, die Rolle des schwarzen Körpers in der visuellen Kultur, die Auswirkungen des Klimawandels in Florida oder das Trauma des Post-Apartheid-Afrika), gelingt es jedem und jeder von ihnen, Momente der Erleuchtung oder Enthüllung zu vermitteln. Insgesamt zeigt die diesjährige Shortlist, dass Künstler*innen selbst in der Ungewissheit der gegenwärtigen globalen Situation immer noch Wege finden, verborgene Wahrheiten aufzudecken und uns dazu zu bringen, die Welt neu zu betrachten – ein Zeugnis für die Fähigkeit der Fotografie, uns unschätzbare Möglichkeiten aufzuzeigen, unsere Perspektiven zu prüfen und zu überdenken."


Anne-Marie Beckmann, Direktorin der Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation:

"Jedes Jahr stehen wir vor der nahezu unmöglichen Aufgabe, vier Künstler*innen und Projekte für die Shortlist des Prize zu bestimmen. Das erinnert mich immer wieder aufs Neue daran, dass die Fotografie nicht nur außergewöhnlich darin ist, eine große Bandbreite an Herangehensweisen und Perspektiven aufzuzeigen, sondern auch die einzigartige Fähigkeit besitzt, vielfältige, leidenschaftliche und wichtige Debatten auszulösen. Die diesjährige Jurysitzung war hinsichtlich der Quantität und Qualität der Diskussion besonders bemerkenswert. Sie ließ uns nicht nur über die Vorzüge der einzelnen Projekte nachdenken, sondern auch über das Wesen, die Bedeutung und den Stellenwert der Fotografie in dieser speziellen und eigenartigen Zeit. Ich denke, das hat uns alle in unserem Glauben an den eigentlichen Wert dieses Mediums bestärkt und damit auch in unserem Glauben an diesen Preis, der die Fotografie weiterhin in den Mittelpunkt der öffentlichen Aufmerksamkeit stellt und ihre gesellschaftliche, politische und kreative Bedeutung fördert. Es ist ein großes Privileg, daran mitzuwirken und erneut eine engere Auswahl an Künstler*innen präsentieren zu können, die auf so interessante und unterschiedliche Weise mit Fotografie arbeiten und eine solche Tiefe an Themen und Perspektiven bieten."


Ansprechpartner für die Medien
Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation:

Oliver Frischemeier
+49 (0) 160 9759 1329
Mail:

The Photographers' Gallery
Grace Gabriele-Tighe bzw. Sofia Desbois (Margaret PR):
bzw.


Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation
Die Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation ist eine gemeinnützige Stiftung mit Sitz in Frankfurt am Main. Ihre Aktivitäten umfassen das Sammeln, Ausstellen und Fördern von zeitgenössischer Fotografie. Die 1999 ins Leben gerufene Art Collection Deutsche Börse umfasst mittlerweile rund 2.200 Arbeiten von mehr als 140 Künstler*innen aus 32 Nationen. Die Sammlung und ein wechselndes Ausstellungsprogramm sind für die Öffentlichkeit zugänglich. Gemeinsam mit der Photographers' Gallery in London vergibt die Foundation jährlich den renommierten Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize. Die Förderung junger Künstler*innen ist der Stiftung ein besonderes Anliegen. Sie unterstützt sie in Form von Auszeichnungen, Stipendien, Ausstellungen und Kooperationen mit anderen Institutionen, wie dem Talentprogramm des Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam. Des Weiteren unterstützt die Stiftung Ausstellungsprojekte internationaler Museen und Institutionen sowie den Ausbau von Plattformen für den wissenschaftlichen Dialog über das Medium Fotografie. Mehr Informationen finden Sie unter www.deutscheboersephotographyfoundation.org.


Die Geschichte des Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize
Der 1996 von der Photographers' Gallery ins Leben gerufene Preis hat sich im Laufe von 26 Jahren zu einem der renommiertesten internationalen Kunstpreise entwickelt und in dieser Zeit die Karrieren zahlreicher Fotograf*innen begründet und gefördert. Der Preis, der früher unter dem Namen Citigroup Photography Prize bekannt war, wird seit 2005 zusammen mit der Gruppe Deutsche Börse verliehen. Im Jahr 2016 wurde er in Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize umbenannt, nachdem die Stiftung, die sich der Sammlung, Ausstellung und Förderung zeitgenössischer Fotografie widmet, als gemeinnützige Organisation gegründet wurde. Die Gewinnerin des Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2021 ist Cao Fei für ihre Ausstellung Blueprints. Zu den bisherigen Preisträgerinnen und Preisträger*innen gehören: Mohamed Bourouissa, Susan Meiselas, Luke Willis Thompson, Dana Lixenberg, Trevor Paglen, Juergen Teller, Rineke Dijkstra, Richard Billingham, John Stezaker und Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin.


The Photographers' Gallery
Die Photographers' Gallery eröffnete 1971 in der Great Newport Street in London als erste unabhängige Galerie mit dem Schwerpunkt Fotografie im Vereinigten Königreich. Dort wurden seither viele namhafte Künstler*innen der internationalen Fotografie ausgestellt, darunter Juergen Teller, Robert Capa, Sebastião Salgado und Andreas Gursky. Die Galerie hat wesentlich dazu beigetragen, zeitgenössische britische Fotografen wie Martin Parr und Corinne Day bekannt zu machen. Im Jahr 2009 zog die Gallery in ein neues mehrstöckiges Gebäude in der Ramillies Street in Soho und öffnete im Jahre 2012 ihre Türen für die Öffentlichkeit nach Umsetzung eines ambitionierten Umbauplans, der auf drei Etagen mit hochmodernen Ausstellungsräumen sowie Veranstaltungsräumlichkeiten, eine Galerie zum Vertrieb von Drucken, eine Buchhandlung und ein Café beherbergt. In den letzten vier Jahrzehnten hat der Erfolg der Photographers' Gallery dazu beigetragen, Fotografie als eine anerkannte Form der Kunst zu etablieren, ein neues Publikum für die Fotografie zu gewinnen und ihr einen festen Platz im Zentrum der visuellen Kunst zu verschaffen. 
www.deutscheboersephotographyfoundation.org


Social media:

Instagram: @dboersephotographyfoundation
Facebook: @DeutscheBoersePhotographyFoundation

Instagram: @thephotographersgallery 
Twitter: @TPGallery 
Facebook: @ThePhotographersGalleryLDN

Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022
Gilles Peress, Whatever You Say, Say Nothing: from the chapter, The Last Night © Gilles Peress, Courtesy of artist
Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022
Jo Ractliffe, Roadside stall on the way to Viana, 2007 from the series Terreno Ocupado © Jo Ractliffe, Courtesy of the artist
Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022
Anastasia Samoylova, The Tea Room, 2018, from the series FloodZone © Anastasia Samoylova, Courtesy of artist
Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2022
Gilles Peress, Whatever You Say, Say Nothing: from the chapter, Saturday © Gilles Peress, Courtesy of artist